Do Press Releases Still Matter?

Do Press Releases Still Matter?

Tell us if this scenario sounds familiar. Your inbox is flooded. Your news feeds are a confusing mess of conflicting voices and fake stories. Your curated content needs focus. But where do you start?

Enter the press release. You might remember them. You probably still receive one every once in a while. But while some might say the press release has gone the way of the dodo, we’re here to argue otherwise – and to show how you can best utilise one in your everyday business.

Press releases once played an important role in connecting public relations marketers with content creators. Hong Kong copywriting companies would be hired long-term to assist businesses in their press release needs. But today, that line has become so blurred, it's hard to tell if it ever existed.

Some would argue that social media, blogs and content marketing have replaced the humble press release, and that might be true to a certain extent. But the simple fact is, good content is built on focus.

Writers, bloggers, marketers – everyone involved in the content world these days is a curator in a sense. And in a time-pressed city like Hong Kong, searching for strong content means sifting through endless sources to find something fresh.

That's where a press release can come into play.

Old-Fashioned Benefits

Why are press releases still important? A press release puts everything together in a short, succinct way. Information, images, links and follow-through, all in one small package. Everything a good content-seeker would want, is there in a press release.

It doesn’t matter if you hire a Hong Kong copywriter, or write it yourself – a strong press release captures attention and creates awareness. It builds your brand’s story, without a content creator having to search through misleading facts or misappropriated information.

Then there’s its long-standing history. Press releases are traditional enough that they still command respect. While fake stories flood our news feeds, a press release is still held as a beacon of reality and reliability. A content expert receiving a press release understands that while parts should be taken with a grain of salt, the overall arching picture can be trusted.

And a press release has the automatic benefit of distribution. PR newswires, aggregators, email services -- these are essential, time-honoured methods to share your story with the world. And at the same time, they allow you send out your press release to thousands – or even, hundreds of thousands – at once.

So Where Do You Start?

So with all that in mind, you want to consider a press release. Hiring a copywriter in Hong Kong can certainly help, but putting together a strong press release can also be done in-house. There are a few important things to remember, though.

Always start with a story. Treat your press release like it’s a news piece, since the news-makers are the ones you’ll be targeting. Make sure it kicks off with an enticing lead, and be sure figure out what interests both the writer and their audience.

Emphasise the ‘why’. Make sure there’s a focus on what makes the story important. Build interest by sharing background information, alongside facts that can you’re your readers understand its overall importance.

Keep things short and simple. Don’t push it. Focus on the most essential bits of information, especially in the opening few sentences. These might be the only words an aggregator displays, and you’ll want to make a real impact here. The bottom line: Short sentences and focus on the facts.

End with a call to action. Be sure to finish it all off with a way to interact. For example, add contact details to receive additional information or attend your event. Make sure the people know how to get in touch.

In our content-mad days, a press release can be an invaluable source of focused information. It helps align your needs, aids content creators in wading through infinite information, offers a simple product that can be distributed to thousands of channels, and has a long-standing history that shouldn’t be ignored.